actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

Sin filtro

Atardecer sin filtro

Shit your pants, America. #reading Flash Boys by Michael Lewis

Paco’s evolution: from homeless to forever home, with a really bad haircut from SPCA in between. #rescuedogs #aspca #tinywhitebuffalo

saturdaychores:

Saturday Chores #3, March 22, 2014

Grayson and I woke up at 3:30 AM this Saturday to run our first 25K. A 25K is about 15.5 miles, or a half-marathon plus a few. We drove 30 minutes to Durham, a few towns over, and then took a bus to Chapel Hill. Then, we ran back to Durham. It was stupid. 

The race was at the ass-crack of dawn, so we were able to make it back to Raleigh in time for Saturday Chores. My legs were shaking and I could barely hold the sign. I doubt the people who honked knew that I threw up as soon as we walked back to our car. 

Honk, honk.

saturdaychores:

Saturday Chores #6, July 5, 2014

This sign was all Grayson’s idea. I couldn’t stop laughing.

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Alexander Hamilton’s Oath of Allegiance , 05/12/1778.
Item From: War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records. (03/04/1907-09/18/1947)
Every new American had to take this oath after declaring independence from King George and England.
Source:http://go.usa.gov/DEGG
usnatarchivesexhibits:

Alexander Hamilton’s Oath of Allegiance , 05/12/1778.
Item From: War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records. (03/04/1907-09/18/1947)
Every new American had to take this oath after declaring independence from King George and England.
Source:http://go.usa.gov/DEGG

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Alexander Hamilton’s Oath of Allegiance , 05/12/1778.

Item From: War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records. (03/04/1907-09/18/1947)

Every new American had to take this oath after declaring independence from King George and England.

Source:http://go.usa.gov/DEGG