Bresnahan is obviously vying for a job at Fox. 

nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it! nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…
The Humanity Project by Jean Thompson (Here she is on All Things Considered.)
The Affairs Of Others by Amy Grace Loyd (Here’s Rachel Louise Snyder’s review.)
In nonfiction …
Sister Mother Husband Dog (etc.) by Delia Ephron (Here she is on Fresh Air.)
Average Is Over by Tyler Cowen (Here he is on Morning Edition.)
An Appetite for Wonder: The Making of a Scientist by Richard Dawkins (Here’s J.P. O’Malley’s review.)
Reign of Error by Diane Ravitch (Here she is on Morning Edition.)
League of Denial by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru (Here’s Mark on Morning Edition.)


That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it!

nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…

In nonfiction …

That Diane Ravitch book will probably say what I’ve been saying forever; Charter schools pose a very real threat to democracy. Can’t wait to read it!


Elizabeth Taylor on the set of Cleopatra (1963)

All about those inaccurate portrayals of Cleopatra

Elizabeth Taylor on the set of Cleopatra (1963)

All about those inaccurate portrayals of Cleopatra

(via vintagegal)

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty

This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces.

Interesting notes

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool

Sin filtro

Atardecer sin filtro

Shit your pants, America. #reading Flash Boys by Michael Lewis

Paco’s evolution: from homeless to forever home, with a really bad haircut from SPCA in between. #rescuedogs #aspca #tinywhitebuffalo